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AllMusic Review: Astral Weeks is generally considered one of the best albums in pop music history, but for all that renown, it is anything but an archetypal rock & roll album. It it isn’t a rock & roll album at all. Van Morrison plays acoustic guitar and sings in his elastic, bluesy, soulful voice, accompanied by crack group of jazz studio players: guitarist Jay Berliner, upright bassist Richard Davis, Modern Jazz Quartet drummer Connie Kay, vibraphonist Warren Smith and soprano saxophonist John Payne (also credited on flute, though that’s debatable — some claim an anonymous flutist provided those parts). Producer Lewis Merenstein added chamber orchestrations later and divided the album into halves: “In The Beginning” and “Afterwards” with four tunes under each heading. Morrison’s songs are an instinctive, organic mixture of Celtic folk, blues, and jazz. He fully enters the mystic here, more in the moment than he ever would be again in a recording studio. If his pop hit “Brown-Eyed Girl” was the first place he explored the “previous” — i.e., the depths of his memory — for inspiration and direction, he immerses himself in it here. The freewheeling, loose feel adds to the intimacy and immediacy in the songs. They are, for the most part, extended, incantatory, loosely narrative, and poetic ruminations on his Belfast upbringing: its characters, shops, streets, alleys, and sidewalks, all framed by the innocence and passage of that era. Morrison seems hypnotized by his subjects; they comfort and haunt a present filled with inexhaustible longing and loneliness. He confesses as much in the title track: “If I ventured in the slipstream/Between the viaducts of your dream/Where immobile steel rims crack/And the ditch in the back roads stop/ Could you find me?/Would you kiss-a my eyes/…To be born again….” Morrison doesn’t reach out to the listener, but goes deep inside himself to excavate and explore. The album’s centerpiece is “Madame George,” a stream-of-consciousness narrative of personal psychological and spiritual archetypes deeply influenced by the road novels of Jack Kerouac. The climactic epiphany experienced on “Cyprus Avenue” paints a portrait of place and time so vividly, it fools listeners into the experience of shared — but mythical — memory. “The Way Young Lovers Do” is the most fully formed tune here. Its swinging jazz verses and tight rhythmic choruses underscore a simmering, passionate eroticism in Morrison’s lyric and delivery. Astral Weeks is a justified entry in pop music’s pantheon. It is unlike any record before or since; it mixes together the very best of postwar popular music in an emotional outpouring cast in delicate, subtle musical structures. — http://albumsbeforeyoudie.com/jugar-al-blackjack-online-con-dinero-real/

Track Listing:

Part One: In The Beginning
No. Title Length
1. “Astral Weeks” 7:06
2. “Beside You” 5:16
3. “Sweet Thing” 4:25
4. “Cyprus Avenue” 7:00
Part Two: Afterwards
No. Title Length
1. “The Way Young Lovers Do” 3:18
2. “Madame George” 9:45
3. “Ballerina” 7:03
4. “Slim Slow Slider” 3:17

 

 

Schill Score: 8/10

 

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Elephant Mountain (1969) is the Youngbloods’ third long-player and marks their debut as a trio — featuring Jesse Colin Young (bass/guitar/vocals), Joe Bauer (drums), and Lowell “Banana” Levinger (keyboards) — after the departure of co-founder Jerry Corbitt (guitar/vocals). Although the band initially formed out of the early ’60s Northeast folk scene, by the time this set was issued they had relocated to the pastoral Northern California county of Marin. Blending affective pop/rock melodies and lyrics with their good time jug band roots, the Youngbloods were instantly embraced by the already blossoming Bay Area music community. This effort contains some of the band’s strongest material to date, building on the considerable momentum of their 1967 self-titled release and further enhanced by their remarkable instrumental capabilities. Young’s contributions are particularly notable as he vacillates between the edgy and electric “Darkness, Darkness” to the light and earthy “Sunlight” and “Ride the Wind,” or the bouncy tales “Smug” and “Beautiful.” Banana honors his new surroundings with the gorgeous and catchy instrumental “On Sir Francis Drake” (named after a heavily traveled Bay Area motorway). On this cut the textural combination of electric piano and harpsichord provides a jazzy counterbalance to Young’s propulsive basslines and Bauer’s nimble drumming. The “Rain Song (Don’t Let the Rain Bring You Down)” is left over from Corbitt’s tenure and recalls the earlier Youngbloods’ sound which was more akin to the Sopwith Camel or the Lovin’ Spoonful than the trio’s then-current folk-rock leanings. “Trillium” is a hidden gem of a jam that examines the band’s remarkably strong improvisational interaction. “Sham” is perhaps the most straightforward rocker on the album and recalls Bay Area acts like the Sal Valentino-led Stoneground. The disc concludes with the sublime “Ride the Wind” which sports a very sophisticated and slightly Latin-flavored melody. — Lindsay Planer

Track Listing:

Side one

  1. “Darkness, Darkness” (Jesse Colin Young) – 3:51
  2. “Smug” (Young) – 2:13
  3. “On Sir Francis Drake” (Lowell Levinger) – 6:44
  4. “Sunlight” (Young) – 3:07
  5. “Double Sunlight” (Levinger, Young, Joe Bauer) – 0:41
  6. “Beautiful” (Young) – 3:49
  7. “Turn It Over” (Levinger, Young, Bauer) – 0:15

Side two

  1. “Rain Song (Don’t Let the Rain Bring You Down)” (Jerry Corbitt, Pappalardi, Collins) – 3:13
  2. “Trillium” (Levinger, Young, Bauer) – 3:08
  3. “Quicksand”* (Young) – 2:41
  4. “Black Mountain Breakdown” (Levinger, Young, Bauer) – 0:40
  5. “Sham”* (Young) – 2:44
  6. “Ride the Wind” (Young) – 6:37

 

Schill Score: 7.5/10

 

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The Velvet Underground – The Velvet Underground (1969)

AllMusic Review: Upon first release, the Velvet Underground’s self-titled third album must have surprised their fans nearly as much as their first two albums shocked the few mainstream music fans who heard them. After testing the limits of how musically and thematically challenging rock could be on Velvet Underground & Nico and White Light/White Heat, this 1969 release sounded spare, quiet, and contemplative, as if the previous albums documented some manic, speed-fueled party and this was the subdued morning after. (The album’s relative calm has often been attributed to the departure of the band’s most committed avant-gardist, John Cale, in the fall of 1968; the arrival of new bassist Doug Yule; and the theft of the band’s amplifiers shortly before they began recording.) But Lou Reed’s lyrical exploration of the demimonde is as keen here as on any album he ever made, while displaying a warmth and compassion he sometimes denied his characters. “Candy Says,” “Pale Blue Eyes,” and “I’m Set Free” may be more muted in approach than what the band had done in the past, but “What Goes On” and “Beginning to See the Light” made it clear the VU still loved rock & roll, and “The Murder Mystery” (which mixes and matches four separate poetic narratives) is as brave and uncompromising as anything on White Light/White Heat. This album sounds less like the Velvet Underground than any of their studio albums, but it’s as personal, honest, and moving as anything Lou Reed ever committed to tape. — Mark Deming

Track Listing:

Side one
No. Title Lead vocals Length
1. “Candy Says” Yule 4:04
2. “What Goes On” Reed 4:55
3. “Some Kinda Love” Reed 4:03
4. “Pale Blue Eyes” Reed 5:41
5. “Jesus” Reed with Yule 3:24
Side two
No. Title Lead vocals Length
1. “Beginning to See the Light” Reed 4:41
2. “I’m Set Free” Reed 4:08
3. “That’s the Story of My Life” Reed 1:59
4. “The Murder Mystery” Reed, Morrison, Yule, and Tucker 8:55
5. “After Hours” Tucker 2:07

 

Schill Score: 10/10

 

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The Temptations – Cloud Nine (1969)

AllMusic Review: Best known for their silky soul vocals and smooth-stepping routines, the Temptations were firmly entrenched as the undisputed kings of Barry Gordy’s Motown stable when cutting-edge producer Norman Whitfield walked into the studio and announced that it was time to shake things up. The resulting freakout became the first half of the stellar Cloud Nine, an album that would become one of the defining early funk sets, with songs that not only took Motown in a new direction, but helped to shape a genre as well. On one side and across three jams, Whitfield and the Temptations would give ’70s-era funk musicians a broad palette from which to draw inspiration. The title track, with its funky soul bordering on psychedelic frenzy, was an audacious album opener, and surely gave older fans a moment’s pause. Only two more songs rounded out side one: an incredibly fresh take on “I Heard It Through the Grapevine,” which jazzed up the vocals, brought compelling percussion to the fore, and relegated the piano well into the wings, and “Run Away Child, Running Wild,” an extravagant nine-minute groove where the sonics easily surpassed the vocals. After shaking up the record-buying public with these three masterpieces, the Temptations brought things back to form for side two. Here, their gorgeous vocals dominated slick arrangements across seven tracks which included “Hey Girl” and the masterful “I Need Your Lovin’.” Funk continued to percolate — albeit subtly — but compared to side one, it was Temptations business as usual. It was this return to the classic sound, however, which ultimately gave Cloud Nine its odd dynamic. The dichotomy of form between old and new between sides doesn’t allow for a continuous gel. But the brash experimentation away from traditional Motown on the three seminal tracks which open the disc shattered the doorway between past and present as surely as the decade itself imploded and smooth soul gave way to blistering funk. — Amy Hanson

Track Listing:

 

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Leads(s) Length
1. “Cloud Nine” Barrett Strong, Norman Whitfield Edwards, Kendricks, P. Williams, Franklin, O. Williams 3:27
2. “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” Strong, Whitfield Edwards, Kendricks 3:00
3. “Run Away Child, Running Wild” Strong, Whitfield Edwards, Kendricks, P. Williams, Franklin, O. Williams 9:38
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Leads(s) Length
1. “Love is a Hurtin’ Thing” Ben Raleigh, Dave Linden Edwards, Kendricks, Franklin 2:28
2. “Hey Girl” Gerry Goffin, Carole King P. Williams 2:38
3. “Why Did She Have to Leave Me (Why Did She Have to Go)” Strong, Whitfield Edwards 2:56
4. “I Need Your Lovin'” Strong, Whitfield Kendricks 2:35
5. “Don’t Let Him Take Your Love From Me” Strong, Whitfield P. Williams 2:31
6. “I Gotta Find a Way (To Get You Back)” Strong, Whitfield, Eddie Holland, Cornelius Grant, Eddie Kendricks Edwards 3:00
7. “Gonna Keep on Tryin’ till I Win Your Love” Strong, Whitfield Edwards 2:32

 

Schill Score:  9/10

 

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The Stooges – The Stooges (1969)

AllMusic Review: While the Stooges had a few obvious points of influence — the swagger of the early Rolling Stones, the horny pound of the Troggs, the fuzztone sneer of a thousand teenage garage bands, and the Velvet Underground’s experimental eagerness to leap into the void — they didn’t really sound like anyone else around when their first album hit the streets in 1969. It’s hard to say if Ron Asheton, Scott Asheton, Dave Alexander, and the man then known as Iggy Stooge were capable of making anything more sophisticated than this, but if they were, they weren’t letting on, and the best moments of this record document the blithering inarticulate fury of the post-adolescent id. Ron Asheton’s guitar runs (fortified with bracing use of fuzztone and wah-wah) are so brutal and concise they achieve a naïve genius, while Scott Asheton’s proto-Bo Diddley drums and Dave Alexander’s solid bass stomp these tunes into submission with a force that inspires awe. And Iggy’s vividly blank vocals fill the “so what?” shrug of a thousand teenagers with a wealth of palpable arrogance and wondrous confusion. One of the problems with being a trailblazing pioneer is making yourself understood to others, and while John Cale seemed sympathetic to what the band was doing, he didn’t appear to quite get it, and as a result he made a physically powerful band sound a bit sluggish on tape. But “1969,” “I Wanna Be Your Dog,” “Real Cool Time,” “No Fun,” and other classic rippers are on board, and one listen reveals why they became clarion calls in the punk rock revolution. Part of the fun of The Stooges is, then as now, the band managed the difficult feat of sounding ahead of their time and entirely out of their time, all at once. — Mark Deming

Track Listing:

Side A
No. Title Length
1. “1969” 4:05
2. “I Wanna Be Your Dog” 3:09
3. “We Will Fall” 10:18
Side B
No. Title Length
1. “No Fun” 5:14
2. “Real Cool Time” 2:29
3. “Ann” 3:00
4. “Not Right” 2:50
5. “Little Doll” 3:20

 

Schill Score: 3/10

 

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The Rolling Stones – Let It Bleed (1969)

AllMusic Review: Mostly recorded without Brian Jones — who died several months before its release (although he does play on two tracks) and was replaced by Mick Taylor (who also plays on just two songs) — this extends the rock and blues feel of Beggars Banquet into slightly harder-rocking, more demonically sexual territory. The Stones were never as consistent on album as their main rivals, the Beatles, and Let It Bleed suffers from some rather perfunctory tracks, like “Monkey Man” and a countrified remake of the classic “Honky Tonk Woman” (here titled “Country Honk”). Yet some of the songs are among their very best, especially “Gimme Shelter,” with its shimmering guitar lines and apocalyptic lyrics; the harmonica-driven “Midnight Rambler”; the druggy party ambience of the title track; and the stunning “You Can’t Always Get What You Want,” which was the Stones’ “Hey Jude” of sorts, with its epic structure, horns, philosophical lyrics, and swelling choral vocals. “You Got the Silver” (Keith Richards’ first lead vocal) and Robert Johnson’s “Love in Vain,” by contrast, were as close to the roots of acoustic down-home blues as the Stones ever got. — Richie Unterberger

Track Listing

Side one
No. Title Length
1. “Gimme Shelter” 4:31
2. “Love in Vain” 4:19
3. “Country Honk” 3:09
4. “Live with Me” 3:33
5. “Let It Bleed” 5:26
Total length: 20:58
Side two
No. Title Length
1. “Midnight Rambler” 6:52
2. “You Got the Silver” 2:51
3. “Monkey Man” 4:12
4. “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” 7:28
Total length: 21:23

 

Schill Score:  9.5/10

 

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The Kinks – Arthur: Or The Decline And Fall Of The British Empire (1969)

AllMusic Review: Arthur (Or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire) extends the British-oriented themes of Village Green Preservation Society, telling the story of a London man’s decision to move to Australia during the aftermath of World War II. It’s a detailed and loving song cycle, capturing the minutiae of suburban life, the numbing effect of bureaucracy, and the horrors of war. On paper, Arthur sounds like a pretentious mess, but Ray Davies’ lyrics and insights have rarely been so graceful or deftly executed, and the music is remarkable. An edgier and harder-rocking affair than Village Green, Arthur is as multi-layered musically as it is lyrically. “Shangri-La” evolves from English folk to hard rock, “Drivin'” has a lazy grace, “Young and Innocent Days” is a lovely, wistful ballad, “Some Mother’s Son” is one of the most uncompromising antiwar songs ever recorded, while “Victoria” and “Arthur” rock with simple glee. The music makes the words cut deeper, and the songs never stray too far from the album’s subject, making Arthur one of the most effective concept albums in rock history, as well as one of the best and most influential British pop records of its era. — Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Track Listing:

Side one
No. Title Length
1. “Victoria” 3:40
2. “Yes Sir, No Sir” 3:46
3. “Some Mother’s Son” 3:25
4. “Drivin'” 3:21
5. “Brainwashed” 2:34
6. “Australia” 6:46
Side two
No. Title Length
1. “Shangri-La” 5:20
2. “Mr. Churchill Says” 4:42
3. “She’s Bought a Hat Like Princess Marina” 3:07
4. “Young and Innocent Days” 3:21
5. “Nothing to Say” 3:08
6. “Arthur” 5:27

 

Schill Score: 8.5/10

 

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The Bee Gees – Odessa (1969)

AllMusic Review: The group members may disagree for personal reasons, but Odessa is easily the best and most enduring of the Bee Gees’ albums of the 1960s. It was also their most improbable success, owing to the conflicts behind its making. The project started out as a concept album to be called “Masterpeace” and then “The American Opera,” but musical differences between Barry and Robin Gibb that would split the trio in two also forced the abandonment of the underlying concept. Instead, it became a double LP — largely at the behest of their manager and the record labels; oddly enough, given that the group didn’t plan on doing something that ambitious, Odessa is one of perhaps three double albums of the entire decade (the others being Blonde on Blonde and The Beatles) that don’t seem stretched, and it also served as the group’s most densely orchestrated album. Yet amid the progressive rock sounds of the title track and ethereal ballads such as “Melody Fair” and “Lamplight” were country-flavored tunes like “Marlery Purt Drive” and the vaguely Dylanesque bluegrass number “Give Your Best,” delicate pop ballads like “First of May” (which became the single off the album), and strange, offbeat rock numbers like “Edison” (whose introduction sounds like the Bee Gees parodying Cream’s “White Room”), and “Whisper Whisper” (the latter featuring a drum break, no less), interspersed with three heavily orchestrated instrumentals. Even the seeming “lesser” numbers such as “Suddenly” had catchy hooks and engaging acoustic guitar parts to carry them, all reminiscent of the Moody Blues’ album cuts of the same era. Moreover, the title track, with its mix of acoustic guitar, solo cello, and full orchestra, was worthy of the Moody Blues at their boldest. The myriad sounds and textures made Odessa the most complex and challenging album in the group’s history, and if one accepts the notion of the Bee Gees as successors to the Beatles, then Odessa was arguably their Sgt. Pepper’s. The album was originally packaged in a red felt cover with gold lettering on front and back and an elaborate background painting for the gatefold interior, which made it a conversation piece. — Bruce Eder

Track Listing

Side one
No. Title Lead vocals Length
1. “Odessa (City on the Black Sea)” Robin 7:33
2. “You’ll Never See My Face Again” Barry 4:16
3. “Black Diamond” Robin 3:27
Total length: 15:16
Side two
No. Title Lead vocals Length
4. “Marley Purt Drive” Barry 4:26
5. “Edison” Robin and Barry 3:07
6. “Melody Fair” Barry and Maurice 3:48
7. “Suddenly” Maurice 2:29
8. “Whisper Whisper” Barry 3:24
Total length: 17:14
Side three
No. Title Lead vocals Length
9. “Lamplight” Robin 4:47
10. “Sound of Love” Barry 3:27
11. “Give Your Best” Barry 3:26
12. “Seven Seas Symphony” Instrumental 4:09
13. “With All Nations (International Anthem)” Instrumental 1:46
Total length: 17:35
Side four
No. Title Lead vocals Length
14. “I Laugh in Your Face” Barry and Robin 4:09
15. “Never Say Never Again” Barry 3:28
16. “First of May” Barry 2:50
17. “The British Opera” Instrumental 3:17
Total length: 13:44

 

Schill Score: 7/10

 

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The Beatles – Abbey Road (1969)

AllMusic Review: Conventional wisdom holds that the Beatles intended Abbey Road as a grand farewell, a suspicion seemingly confirmed by the elegiac note Paul McCartney strikes at the conclusion of its closing suite. It’s hard not to interpret “And in the end/the love you take/is equal to the love you make” as a summation not only of Abbey Road but perhaps of the group’s entire career, a lovely final sentiment. The truth is perhaps a bit messier than this. The Beatles had tentative plans to move forward after the September 1969 release of Abbey Road, plans that quickly fell apart at the dawn of the new decade, and while the existence of that goal calls into question the intentionality of the album as a finale, it changes not a thing about what a remarkable goodbye the record is. In many ways, Abbey Road stands apart from the rest of the Beatles’ catalog, an album that gains considerable strength from its lush, enveloping production — a recording so luxuriant, it glosses over aesthetic differences between the group’s main three songwriters and ties together a series of disconnected unfinished songs into a complete suite. Where Sgt. Pepper pioneered such mind-bending aural techniques, Abbey Road truly seized the possibilities of the studio and, in doing so, pointed the way forward to the album rock era of the 1970s. Many of the studio tricks arrive during that brilliant suite of songs, a sequence that lasts nearly a full side of an album. Here, McCartney’s playful eccentricity juts against John Lennon’s curdled cynicism, while the band thrills in sudden changes of mood and plays plenty of guitar, culminating in McCartney, Lennon, and George Harrison trading solos on “The End.” The depth of sonic detail within “You Never Give Me Your Money” and “She Came in Through the Window” provided ideas for entire subgenres of pop in the ’70s, but Abbey Road also contains a handful of the most enduring Beatles songs, each adding a new emotional maturity to their catalog. The subdued boogie of Lennon’s “Come Together” contains a sensuality previously unheard in the Beatles — it’s matched by “Because,” which may be the best showcase for the group’s harmonies — Harrison’s “Something” is a love ballad of unusual sensitivity, and his “Here Comes the Sun” is incandescent, perhaps his purest expression of joy. As good as these individual moments are, what makes Abbey Road transcendent is how the album is so much greater than the sum of its parts. While a single song or segment can be dazzling, having a succession of marvelous, occasionally intertwined moments is not only a marvel but indeed a summation of everything that made the Beatles great. — Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Track Listing:

All tracks are written by Lennon–McCartney, except where noted.

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Lead vocals Length
1. “Come Together” Lennon 4:19
2. “Something” George Harrison Harrison 3:02
3. “Maxwell’s Silver Hammer” McCartney 3:27
4. “Oh! Darling” McCartney 3:27
5. “Octopus’s Garden” Richard Starkey Starr 2:51
6. “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” Lennon 7:47
Total length: 24:53
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Lead vocals Length
1. “Here Comes the Sun” Harrison Harrison 3:05
2. “Because” Lennon, McCartney and Harrison 2:45
3. “You Never Give Me Your Money” McCartney 4:03
4. “Sun King” Lennon, with McCartney and Harrison 2:26
5. “Mean Mr. Mustard” Lennon 1:06
6. “Polythene Pam” Lennon 1:13
7. “She Came In Through the Bathroom Window” McCartney 1:58
8. “Golden Slumbers” McCartney 1:31
9. “Carry That Weight” McCartney, with Lennon, Harrison and Starr 1:36
10. “The End” McCartney 2:05
11. “Her Majesty” McCartney 0:23
Total length: 22:10

 

Schill Score: 9/10

 

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The Band – The Band (1969)

AllMusic Review: The Band’s first album, Music from Big Pink, seemed to come out of nowhere, with its ramshackle musical blend and songs of rural tragedy. The Band, the group’s second album, was a more deliberate and even more accomplished effort, partially because the players had become a more cohesive unit, and partially because guitarist Robbie Robertson had taken over the songwriting, writing or co-writing all 12 songs. Though a Canadian, Robertson focused on a series of American archetypes from the union worker in “King Harvest (Has Surely Come)” and the retired sailor in “Rockin’ Chair” to, most famously, the Confederate Civil War observer Virgil Cane in “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down.” The album effectively mixed the kind of mournful songs that had dominated Music from Big Pink, here including “Whispering Pines” and “When You Awake” (both co-written by Richard Manuel), with rollicking up-tempo numbers like “Rag Mama Rag” and “Up on Cripple Creek” (both sung by Levon Helm and released as singles, with “Up on Cripple Creek” making the Top 40). As had been true of the first album, it was The Band’s sound that stood out the most, from Helm’s (and occasionally Manuel’s) propulsive drumming to Robertson’s distinctive guitar fills and the endlessly inventive keyboard textures of Garth Hudson, all topped by the rough, expressive singing of Manuel, Helm, and Rick Danko that mixed leads with harmonies. The arrangements were simultaneously loose and assured, giving the songs a timeless appeal, while the lyrics continued to paint portraits of 19th century rural life (especially Southern life, as references to Tennessee and Virginia made clear), its sometimes less savory aspects treated with warmth and humor. — William Ruhlmann

Track Listing:

All tracks written by Robbie Robertson unless noted.

Side one

No. Title Writer(s) Lead vocals Length
1. “Across the Great Divide” Manuel 2:53
2. “Rag Mama Rag” Helm 3:04
3. “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” Helm 3:33
4. “When You Awake”
  • Robertson
  • Richard Manuel
Danko 3:13
5. “Up on Cripple Creek” Helm 4:34
6. “Whispering Pines”
  • Robertson
  • Manuel
Manuel 3:58

Side two

No. Title Writer(s) Lead vocals Length
1. “Jemima Surrender”
  • Robertson
  • Levon Helm
Helm 3:31
2. “Rockin’ Chair” Manuel 3:43
3. “Look Out Cleveland” Danko 3:09
4. “Jawbone”
  • Robertson
  • Manuel
Manuel 4:20
5. “The Unfaithful Servant” Danko 4:17
6. “King Harvest (Has Surely Come)” Manuel 3:39

 

Schill Score: 10/10

 

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