David Bowie – Low (1977)

AllMusic Review: Following through with the avant-garde inclinations of Station to Station, yet explicitly breaking with David Bowie’s past, Low is a dense, challenging album that confirmed his place at rock’s cutting edge. Driven by dissonant synthesizers and electronics, Low is divided between brief, angular songs and atmospheric instrumentals. Throughout the record’s first half, the guitars are jagged and the synthesizers drone with a menacing robotic pulse, while Bowie’s vocals are unnaturally layered and overdubbed. During the instrumental half, the electronics turn cool, which is a relief after the intensity of the preceding avant pop. Half the credit for Low’s success goes to Brian Eno, who explored similar ambient territory on his own releases. Eno functioned as a conduit for Bowie’s ideas, and in turn Bowie made the experimentalism of not only Eno but of the German synth group Kraftwerk and the post-punk group Wire respectable, if not quite mainstream. Though a handful of the vocal pieces on Low are accessible — “Sound and Vision” has a shimmering guitar hook, and “Be My Wife” subverts soul structure in a surprisingly catchy fashion — the record is defiantly experimental and dense with detail, providing a new direction for the avant-garde in rock & roll. — Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Track Listing

All lyrics are written by David Bowie; all music is composed by Bowie, except where noted.

Side one
No. Title Music Length
1. “Speed of Life” 2:46
2. “Breaking Glass” Bowie, Dennis Davis, George Murray 1:51
3. “What in the World” 2:23
4. “Sound and Vision” 3:03
5. “Always Crashing in the Same Car” 3:29
6. “Be My Wife” 2:55
7. “A New Career in a New Town” 2:51
Total length: 19:18
Side two
No. Title Music Length
1. “Warszawa” Bowie, Brian Eno 6:20
2. “Art Decade” 3:43
3. “Weeping Wall” 3:26
4. “Subterraneans” 5:39
Total length: 19:08

Schill Score:  2/10

Schill Comment:  There’s too much of a Brian Eno influence going on here. The albums is mostly just synth noise garbage

 

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David Bowie – Heroes (1977)

AllMusic Review: Repeating the formula of Low’s half-vocal/half-instrumental structure, Heroes develops and strengthens the sonic innovations David Bowie and Brian Eno explored on their first collaboration. The vocal songs are fuller, boasting harder rhythms and deeper layers of sound. Much of the harder-edged sound of Heroes is due to Robert Fripp’s guitar, which provides a muscular foundation for the electronics, especially on the relatively conventional rock songs. Similarly, the instrumentals on Heroes are more detailed, this time showing a more explicit debt to German synth pop and European experimental rock. Essentially, the difference between Low and Heroes lies in the details, but the record is equally challenging and groundbreaking. — Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Track Listing

All tracks are written by David Bowie, except where noted.

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. “Beauty and the Beast” 3:32
2. “Joe the Lion” 3:05
3. “‘Heroes'” Bowie, Brian Eno 6:07
4. “Sons of the Silent Age” 3:15
5. “Blackout” 3:50
Total length: 19:49
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. “V-2 Schneider” 3:10
2. “Sense of Doubt” 3:57
3. “Moss Garden” Bowie, Eno 5:03
4. “Neuköln” Bowie, Eno 4:34
5. “The Secret Life of Arabia” Bowie, Eno, Carlos Alomar 3:46
Total length: 20:30 (40:19)

 

Schill Score:  6/10

 

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David Bowie – Station To Station (1976)

AllMusic Review: Taking the detached plastic soul of Young Americans to an elegant, robotic extreme, Station to Station is a transitional album that creates its own distinctive style. Abandoning any pretense of being a soulman, yet keeping rhythmic elements of soul, David Bowie positions himself as a cold, clinical crooner and explores a variety of styles. Everything from epic ballads and disco to synthesized avant pop is present on Station to Station, but what ties it together is Bowie’s cocaine-induced paranoia and detached musical persona. At its heart, Station to Station is an avant-garde art-rock album, most explicitly on “TVC 15” and the epic sprawl of the title track, but also on the cool crooning of “Wild Is the Wind” and “Word on a Wing,” as well as the disco stylings of “Golden Years.” It’s not an easy album to warm to, but its epic structure and clinical sound were an impressive, individualistic achievement, as well as a style that would prove enormously influential on post-punk. — Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Track Listing

All songs written by David Bowie, except where noted.

Side one
No. Title Length
1. “Station to Station” 10:15
2. “Golden Years” 3:59
3. “Word on a Wing” 6:04
Side two
No. Title Lyrics Music Length
1. “TVC 15” 5:31
2. “Stay” 6:16
3. “Wild Is the Wind” Ned Washington Dimitri Tiomkin 6:06

 

Schill Score:  3/10

 

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David Bowie – Young Americans (1975)

AllMusic Review: David Bowie had dropped hints during the Diamond Dogs tour that he was moving toward R&B, but the full-blown blue-eyed soul of Young Americans came as a shock. Surrounding himself with first-rate sessionmen, Bowie comes up with a set of songs that approximate the sound of Philly soul and disco, yet remain detached from their inspirations; even at his most passionate, Bowie sounds like a commentator, as if the entire album was a genre exercise. Nevertheless, the distance doesn’t hurt the album — it gives the record its own distinctive flavor, and its plastic, robotic soul helped inform generations of synthetic British soul. What does hurt the record is a lack of strong songwriting. “Young Americans” is a masterpiece, and “Fame” has a beat funky enough that James Brown ripped it off, but only a handful of cuts (“Win,” “Fascination,” “Somebody Up There Likes Me”) comes close to matching their quality. As a result, Young Americans is more enjoyable as a stylistic adventure than as a substantive record. — Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Track Listing:

All tracks are written by David Bowie, except where noted.

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. “Young Americans” 5:11
2. “Win” 4:44
3. “Fascination” Bowie, Luther Vandross 5:45
4. “Right” 4:15
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. “Somebody Up There Likes Me” 6:36
2. “Across the Universe” John Lennon, Paul McCartney 4:29
3. “Can You Hear Me?” 5:03
4. “Fame” Bowie, Carlos Alomar, Lennon 4:16

 

Schill Score:  6/10

 

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David Bowie – Aladdin Sane (1973)

AllMusic Review: Ziggy Stardust wrote the blueprint for David Bowie’s hard-rocking glam, and Aladdin Sane essentially follows the pattern, for both better and worse. A lighter affair than Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane is actually a stranger album than its predecessor, buoyed by bizarre lounge-jazz flourishes from pianist Mick Garson and a handful of winding, vaguely experimental songs. Bowie abandons his futuristic obsessions to concentrate on the detached cool of New York and London hipsters, as on the compressed rockers “Watch That Man,” “Cracked Actor,” and “The Jean Genie.” Bowie follows the hard stuff with the jazzy, dissonant sprawls of “Lady Grinning Soul,” “Aladdin Sane,” and “Time,” all of which manage to be both campy and avant-garde simultaneously, while the sweepingly cinematic “Drive-In Saturday” is a soaring fusion of sci-fi doo wop and melodramatic teenage glam. He lets his paranoia slip through in the clenched rhythms of “Panic in Detroit,” as well as on his oddly clueless cover of “Let’s Spend the Night Together.” For all the pleasures on Aladdin Sane, there’s no distinctive sound or theme to make the album cohesive; it’s Bowie riding the wake of Ziggy Stardust, which means there’s a wealth of classic material here, but not enough focus to make the album itself a classic. — Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Track Listing

Side one
  1. “Watch That Man” – 4:30
  2. “Aladdin Sane (1913–1938–197?)” – 5:06
  3. “Drive-In Saturday” – 4:33
  4. “Panic in Detroit” – 4:25
  5. “Cracked Actor” – 3:01
Side two
  1. “Time” – 5:15
  2. “The Prettiest Star” – 3:31
  3. “Let’s Spend the Night Together” (Mick JaggerKeith Richards) – 3:10
  4. “The Jean Genie” – 4:07
  5. “Lady Grinning Soul” – 3:54

 

Schill Score: 7.25/10

 

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David Bowie – The Rise & Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars (1972)

AllMusic Review: Borrowing heavily from Marc Bolan’s glam rock and the future shock of A Clockwork Orange, David Bowie reached back to the heavy rock of The Man Who Sold the World for The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. Constructed as a loose concept album about an androgynous alien rock star named Ziggy Stardust, the story falls apart quickly, yet Bowie’s fractured, paranoid lyrics are evocative of a decadent, decaying future, and the music echoes an apocalyptic, nuclear dread. Fleshing out the off-kilter metallic mix with fatter guitars, genuine pop songs, string sections, keyboards, and a cinematic flourish, Ziggy Stardust is a glitzy array of riffs, hooks, melodrama, and style and the logical culmination of glam. Mick Ronson plays with a maverick flair that invigorates rockers like “Suffragette City,” “Moonage Daydream,” and “Hang Onto Yourself,” while “Lady Stardust,” “Five Years,” and “Rock ‘n’ Roll Suicide” have a grand sense of staged drama previously unheard of in rock & roll. And that self-conscious sense of theater is part of the reason why Ziggy Stardust sounds so foreign. Bowie succeeds not in spite of his pretensions but because of them, and Ziggy Stardust — familiar in structure, but alien in performance — is the first time his vision and execution met in such a grand, sweeping fashion. — Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Track Listing:

Side one
  1. “Five Years” – 4:42
  2. “Soul Love” – 3:34
  3. “Moonage Daydream” – 4:40
  4. “Starman” – 4:10
  5. “It Ain’t Easy”  – 2:58
Side two
  1. “Lady Stardust” – 3:22
  2. “Star” – 2:47
  3. “Hang On to Yourself” – 2:40
  4. “Ziggy Stardust” – 3:13
  5. “Suffragette City” – 3:25
  6. “Rock ‘n’ Roll Suicide” – 2:58

 

Schill Score:  9/10

 

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David Bowie – Hunky Dory (1972)

AllMusic Review: After the freakish hard rock of The Man Who Sold the World, David Bowie returned to singer/songwriter territory on Hunky Dory. Not only did the album boast more folky songs (“Song for Bob Dylan,” “The Bewlay Brothers”), but he again flirted with Anthony Newley-esque dancehall music (“Kooks,” “Fill Your Heart”), seemingly leaving heavy metal behind. As a result, Hunky Dory is a kaleidoscopic array of pop styles, tied together only by Bowie’s sense of vision: a sweeping, cinematic mélange of high and low art, ambiguous sexuality, kitsch, and class. Mick Ronson’s guitar is pushed to the back, leaving Rick Wakeman’s cabaret piano to dominate the sound of the album. The subdued support accentuates the depth of Bowie’s material, whether it’s the revamped Tin Pan Alley of “Changes,” the Neil Young homage “Quicksand,” the soaring “Life on Mars?,” the rolling, vaguely homosexual anthem “Oh! You Pretty Things,” or the dark acoustic rocker “Andy Warhol.” On the surface, such a wide range of styles and sounds would make an album incoherent, but Bowie’s improved songwriting and determined sense of style instead made Hunky Dory a touchstone for reinterpreting pop’s traditions into fresh, postmodern pop music. — Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Track Listing

Side one
  1. “Changes” – 3:37
  2. “Oh! You Pretty Things” – 3:12
  3. “Eight Line Poem” – 2:55
  4. “Life on Mars?” – 3:43
  5. “Kooks” – 2:53
  6. “Quicksand” – 5:08
Side two
  1. “Fill Your Heart”  – 3:07
  2. “Andy Warhol” – 3:56
  3. “Song for Bob Dylan” – 4:12
  4. “Queen Bitch” – 3:18
  5. “The Bewlay Brothers” – 5:22

 

Schill Score: 8/10

 

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