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Often cited as the ultimate Tim Buckley statement, Goodbye and Hello is indeed a fabulous album, but it’s merely one side of Tim Buckley’s enormous talent. Recorded in the middle of 1967 (in the afterglow of Sgt. Pepper), this album is clearly inspired by Pepper’s exploratory spirit. More often than not, this helps to bring Buckley’s awesome musical vision home, but occasionally falters. Not that the album is overrated (it’s not), it’s just that it is only one side of Buckley. The finest songs on the album were written by him alone, particularly “Once I Was” and “Pleasant Street.” Buoyed by Jerry Yester’s excellent production, these tracks are easily among the finest example of Buckley’s psychedelic/folk vision. A few tracks, namely the title cut and “No Man Can Find the War,” were co-written by poet Larry Beckett. While Beckett’s lyrics are undoubtedly literate and evocative, they occasionally tend to be too heavy-handed for Buckley. However, this is a minor criticism of an excellent and revolutionary album that was a quantum leap for both Tim Buckley and the audience. — roulette computer

Track Listing:

 

All songs written by Tim Buckley, except where noted.

Side One

  1. “No Man Can Find the War” (Larry Beckett, Buckley) – 2:58
  2. “Carnival Song” – 3:10
  3. “Pleasant Street” – 5:15
  4. “Hallucinations” (Beckett, Buckley) – 4:55
  5. “I Never Asked to Be Your Mountain” – 6:02

Side Two

  1. “Once I Was” – 3:22
  2. “Phantasmagoria in Two” – 3:29
  3. “Knight-Errant” (Beckett, Buckley) – 2:00
  4. “Goodbye and Hello” (Beckett, Buckley) – 8:38
  5. “Morning Glory” (Beckett, Buckley) – 2:52

 

Schill Score:  5.5/10

 

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AllMusic Review: Easily Tim Buckley’s most underrated album, Happy Sad was another departure for the eclectic Southern California-based singer/songwriter. After the success of the widely acclaimed Goodbye and Hello, Buckley mellowed enough to explore his jazz roots. Sounding like Fred Neil’s Capitol-era albums, Buckley and his small, acoustic-based ensemble weave elegant, minimalist tapestries around the six Buckley originals. The effect is completely mesmerizing. On “Buzzin’ Fly” and “Strange Feelin’,” you are slowly drawn into Buckley’s intoxicating vision. The extended opus in the middle of the record, “Love From Room 109,” is an intense, complex composition. Lovingly under-produced by Jerry Yester and Zal Yanovsky, this is one of the finest records of the late ’60s. —real money casino for mobile android phone driver

Track Listing:

Side One

  1. “Strange Feelin'” – 7:40
  2. “Buzzin’ Fly” – 6:04
  3. “Love from Room 109 at the Islander (On Pacific Coast Highway)” – 10:49

Side Two

  1. “Dream Letter” – 5:12
  2. “Gypsy Woman” – 12:19
  3. “Sing a Song for You” – 2:39

 

Schill Score: 7/10

 

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